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Print BPE Probing

BPE Probing
Date Added: 29/03/2009
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Viewed: 6648 times
Comments: 6
Votes: 2
Rating: 8

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 By: iandunn On 30/03/2009
I like this but would argue that you can have a 2* or a 4* and the the * should be used together with the corresponding number.

 By: Connor On 30/03/2009
That's what I was taught Ian,
Also Code 3 - the black band is partially visible

 By: Foxyfloss On 31/03/2009
Ditto to points made above.
Who am I to judge, it was still useful and informative, thanks Shain.

 By: shaun On 05/04/2009
I know its flawed, but this was used to get the GDPs started on the road to succesful BPE charting. We went from very poor to quite good overnight. I have a Powerpoint set of slides too. If anyone wants them to show to their GDPs, let me know!

 By: Debyaa On 22/08/2009
This sounds good, I would like the ppoint presentation if poss. Thanks

 By: LindaD On 07/09/2009
Pretty good article: very similar system to PSR (Periodontal Screening and Recording). But we would combine the * code with the number, whether 2,3, or 4
Patients with PSR code 3 in two sextants, or code 4 or * are supposed to have a full mouth comprehensive perio assessment, including x-rays.

Because of the limitations of this type of screening, many practices in North America are moving towards comprehensive perio assessments, at least annually for all adult patients, with detailed documentation of all probing depths, recession, furcation involvement, and clinical attachment loss.

However, I think that screening systems such as BPE, PSR, and CPITN, have helped to raise the Standard of care in general dental practice, by helping many to evolve, it has facilitated the transition from no perio charting, to screening, and ultimately to regular comprehensive full mouth perio assessments.

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